365 Days for Travelers: Apr 21

Wisdom from Chinese Literary and Buddhist Classics

HOW TO CONDUCT ONESELF

When mundane sentiments become overwhelming,
we must be able to remain detached.
When mundane sentiments become agonizing,
we must be able to endure them.
When mundane sentiments become gloomy,
we must be able to let go.
When mundane sentiments become indulging,
we must be able to abandon them.
When mundane sentiments become chaotic,
we must be able to remain at ease.
When mundane sentiments become a shackle,
we must be able to shatter it.
When mundane sentiments become exaggerating,
we must be able to restrain them.
When mundane sentiments become unbearable,
we must be able to bear them.
When mundane sentiments become intolerable,
we must be able to tolerate them.

SILENCE

Those who have attained the Way have long stopped
clinging onto defilements and worries; they are
naturally able to appreciate better the state of silence.
By silence, it does not mean biting one’s lips but
having absolutely nothing to say from the beginning.
Just as the saying goes, “The knower does not speak,
and the speaker does not know.” When the Buddha
held up a flower at the assembly on Vulture Peak,
the entire congregation remained silent. It was only
Mahakasyapa who broke into a smile. Such meeting
of minds surpasses a thousand of words.